Yoh Komiyama (Product Designer)

Born in 1980 in Tokyo. Founding member of the Window Research Institute. After graduating from Tama Art University, working in an architectural design firm, and as a product designer for a manufacturer, he established Yoh Komiyama Design in 2011, based in Tokyo and Shanghai, a multidisciplinary firm that offers R&D support for both Japanese and foreign
corporations and organizations primarily in the field of product design, develops hardware and services, and handles brand direction. In recent years, the firm has been exploring new forms of craftsmanship and object-making by thinking about the object at hand through protocol and generative approaches and designing a set of rules pertaining to it. Some of his main projects in Japan include the Karimoku Cat series for the furniture company Karimoku, and product design for T Air, the first digital product from Tsutaya Books. His works have
been shown at “TC&D” at the Tokyo Metropolitan Art Museum. Outside Japan, Komiyama has shown his research project “mold” as part of Ventura Projects, at the Salone del Mobile in Milan, at Interni’s “Feeding: New Ideas for the City,” and at the multi-brand boutique Merci in Paris. Awards include the Muji Award Gold Prize, Red Dot Design Award, Design for Asia Award, and Good Design Award.

June 12, 2019

Sash window

A window that opens and closes by moving two or more parallel panels vertically over two or more grooves or rails is called a double sliding window, where both the top and bottom panels move. These sorts of windows developed primarily in the context of English stone built houses, and are commonly used even today in England as well as North America.

May 15, 2019

Double Sliding Window

A window that opens and closes by moving two or more parallel panels horizontally over two or more grooves or rails is called a double sliding window, where both the left and right panels move. This sort of window is an ancient Japanese mechanism for opening and closing, and its original form can be traced back to the yarido sliding panels of the Heian era (B.C. 794 to 1185). They are commonly used even today in Japanese homes.